Is It Postpartum Depression?

The birth of a baby triggers a lot of powerful emotions, from excitement and joy to fear and anxiety. But it also can end in something you would possibly not expect — depression.

Postpartum “baby blues” after childbirth is a familiar experience for most women, which commonly include mood swings, crying spells, anxiety and sleeping disability. Baby blues typically begin within the first 2 to 3 days after delivery and can last for up to 2 weeks.

But some new moms experience a more severe, long-lasting sort of depression known as postpartum depression. Occurs rarely, an extreme mood which develops after childbirth known as Postpartum Psychosis.

Postpartum depression isn’t a personality flaw or a weakness. At times it’s merely a complication of giving birth. Postpartum depression can be cured with prompt treatment by assisting to manage the symptoms and help to bond with your baby

Postpartum depression isn't a personality flaw or a weakness. At times it's merely a complication of giving birth. Postpartum depression can be cured with prompt treatment by assisting to manage the symptoms and help to bond with your baby | wellnisa

How postpartum depression can be diagnosed?

A doctor or psychologist usually diagnosis a woman with postpartum depression based on the symptoms like:

  • Depressed mood or severe mood swings
  • Excessive crying
  • Difficulty in bonding with your baby
  • Withdrawing from family and friends
  • Loss of appetite or eating more than usual
  • Insomnia or excessive sleeping
  • Overwhelming fatigue or loss of energy
  • Loss of interest in activities which you use to enjoy
  • Intense irritability and anger
  • Having a feeling of fear all the time that you’re not a good mother
  • Hopelessness
  • Frequent feeling of worthless, shame, guilt or inadequacy
  • Diminished ability to think clearly, concentrate or make decisions
  • Restlessness

Sometimes the women herself notices the symptoms. Other times a concerned partner, spouse, loved one or friend may notice the symptoms

How postpartum depression can be treated?

Therapy

A psychiatrist, psychologist, or a psychological state professional can provide counselling. Therapy can assist you to tie the destructive thoughts and offer strategies for working towards a positive mindset.

post partum depression therapy | wellnisa

Self-care

This a part of the treatment may be a little harder than it sounds. Practising self-care means cutting yourself some slack. You shouldn’t plan to shoulder more responsibility than you’ll be able to handle. Others might not instinctively know what you would like, so it’s important to inform them. Take some “me time,” but don’t isolate yourself. Consider joining a support group for new mothers.

Communicate

You may be tempted to stay your feelings to yourself, especially if you’re a naturally reserved person. But it’d be helpful to speak things over with someone you trust. You’ll soon realize that you’re never alone which others are willing to participate in your life if you let them.

Rest and relax

Both your body and your spirit need a good night’s sleep. If your baby doesn’t sleep for long periods, get someone to help out with the baby for a few hours so you’ll be able to sleep. If you’ve got trouble drifting off, try a hot bath, a good book, or whatever helps you relax. Meditation and massage may help ease tension and assist you to fall asleep.
Use music, scented candles and aromatherapy practices. Try long warm baths with salt and drops of essential oils.

Sunlight

The sun always helps to improve the mood. Spend some time in the sun every day doing things you love.

The sun always helps to improve the mood. Spend some time in the sun every day doing things you love. | welnisa

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